Mulindry House Incident

This article needs additional research, citations, and verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations and references. Below is the material that has been gathered, unsourced material may be challenged and removed.

The arrest of Sir Lachlan by the Macdonalds was a key incident in the Maclean-Macdonald Feud

From Wikipedia

Angus MacDonald, 8th of Dunnyveg invited Sir Lachlan Mor Maclean, chief of Clan MacLean who was visiting his estates in Islay, to his home at Mulindry (a fortified house north of Mulindry Farm, Islay, Scotland1) in 1586. Sir Lachlan was relucant to go, however as he had Angus's son James and brother Ranald as hostages, he agreed to visit Angus at Mulindry. He brought with him 86 followers and Angus's son James, while Ranald was left in chains at Duart Castle.2 A banquet was held and after Sir Lachlan was lodged in an adjoining residence, the house was surrounded by between 300 or 400 armed men. Angus called for Sir Lachlan to come out and face him in combat, however, Sir Lachlan came to the door with Angus's son James. James pleaded with his father to spare his uncle and Angus agreed to hold Sir Lachlan as a prisoner.3

Sir Lachlan was held prisoner in a chamber at Mulindry, while his retinue were persuaded to surrender upon assuanrances that their lives would be spared. Two refused, a relative of Sir Lauchlan's and the outlaw MacDhomhnuill Herraich of Clan Uisdein, and were set upon and withdrew into the adjoining house and perished when that house was burnt to the ground.4 After news of Sir Lachlan's capture had become known, a rumour was started by Allan Maclean, a kinsman of Sir Lachlan, who had hoped to gain influence should Sir Lachlan be killed, that Ranald who was being held a Duart had been killed in retaliation. Ranald and Angus's brother Coll was incensed by this news and two of the Maclean prisoners were executed every day, until at last only Sir Lauchlan and John Dubh of Morvern remained.5 Sir Lachlan was released after Angus received a large number of hostages and the release of Ranald. Notes

1 "Caisteal Mhic Dhomhnuill". CANMORE. Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Scotland. Retrieved 3 October 2011.
2 A. MacDonald, et.al. p.555.
3 A. MacDonald, et.al. p.556.
4 A. MacDonald, et.al. p.557.
5 A. MacDonald, et.al. p.558.
History of the Highlands & of the Highland Clans, Volume 1, Part 2 pages 205-209

This is not the official site of the Clan Maclean; it does not reflect the opinions or views of the Clan Maclean International nor its affiliates.